Tuesday, March 29, 2011

What's wrong with using an Antiperspirant?

I've had several people ask me why I made the switch from an antiperspirant to just a deodorant.


Of course, this was a personal choice and I have been blessed not to have the problem of profusely sweating.  


When deodorant was invented, bathing wasn't a luxury on a daily basis.  Humans produce one to two pints of sweat, on average, per day.


Here are the reasons I made the switch:


1) Sweating is the body's natural way to release toxins from the body.  


2) Aluminum based compounds are the active ingredient in antiperspirants.  These compounds form a sort of plug within the sweat duct and researchers argue that repeated use of these compounds in and around the breast may be linking to estrogen like hormonal effects.


3) Researchers also debate as to whether or not there is a link between the daily use of aluminum and breast cancer.


What are the safer alternatives?


Well, unfortunately, there are no natural ways to stop sweating completely.  Therefore, the alternatives are simply deodorants - natural ways to mask the smell of body odor.


* Baking soda
* Cornstarch
* Tea Tree Oil


Commercial Brands: Weleda, Burts Bees, J.A.S.O.N, Terressentials, Miessence, Lafe's, Bubble and Bee, Aubrey Organics, Erbaviva, Toms


Make your own deodorant:


Another alternative is to make your own deodorant.


Instructions
  1. In a reusable and resealable container, mix 1 part baking soda with 6 parts cornstarch.  
  2. Close the container and shake vigorously for about a minute, to thoroughly mix the two powders.  
  3. Then dab a small amount to the skin of your armpits with a soft cotton cloth, cotton ball, or cosmetic applicator.  Apply as if you were lightly applying baby powder or cosmetic powder.

Notes:

  • The application should last at least a day 
  • This method hasn’t left any stains or residues on my white or black clothing.  It seems to do better than normal deodorant in that regard! (Still, of course use caution with expensive and/or hard-to-clean items, as you would with any deodorant.)
  • A nice way to store your deodorant powder is in an antique cosmetic jar (above), which you can pick up at a garage sale or thrift store - helps with upcycling as well!

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